YOUR RA TREATMENT PLAN SHOULD HELP YOU MEET YOUR GOALS

Working with a rheumatologist is key to developing an effective treatment plan that’s right for you. And it’s important that your treatment plan starts with having specific treatment goals.

To make the most of your rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment plan, your treatment goals should include more than just clinical goals, like reducing inflammation. You should also set personal goals around how RA impacts your everyday life.

Personal goals can include broad goals, such as getting back to a hobby or activity you enjoy, or can be more specific, like the ability to wear your wedding ring again because of less joint swelling. Sharing these personal goals with your rheumatologist can make it easier to find and maintain a successful treatment plan.

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Sharing personal goals with your
rheumatologist can help keep
you on track to reach them

Hear how people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have set and achieved personal treatment goals with a rheumatologist.

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Only you know what your norm was before…sharing that information with your doctor helps establish a goal to shoot for.

- Carol

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WITH EFFECTIVE TREATMENT,
REMISSION CAN BE POSSIBLE

Inflammation resulting from RA can ebb and flow over time. This measure of inflammation and symptoms is commonly known as disease activity.

While there is currently no cure for RA, maintaining an effective treatment plan can help you achieve remission. During remission, inflammation, RA symptoms, and the risk of permanent joint damage can be greatly reduced; some people even experience little to no inflammation or symptoms.

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Treating RA sooner can increase the likelihood of achieving remission

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Remission is an important goal

When RA is treated soon after diagnosis, it can help increase the chances of reaching remission. But even for those who’ve been living with RA for longer, it’s important to know that your treatment goals should still include:

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Reducing inflammation

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Relieving symptoms

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Preventing further joint damage

Talking to a rheumatologist about treatment goals and remission can be the first step.

Hear what remission can mean for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

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For me, achieving remission is feeling better on a daily basis, consistently.

- Monica

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Did you know that achieving RA remission means living with little to no inflammation or symptoms?

Did you know that achieving RA remission means living with little to no inflammation or symptoms?

Yes

No

While there is no cure for RA, finding and maintaining the right treatment plan helps reduce inflammation, which can ultimately help you achieve remission, or little to no inflammation or symptoms. A rheumatologist can help you understand what remission could mean for you.

Get 1-on-1 personalized support at no cost to you. Call 1-800-655-3097.