How much do your current RA symptoms impact your physical ability to do everyday tasks?

Over time, you may notice that RA has affected your ability to do something that you used to do without difficulty or pain. Consider how your RA has impacted activities such as getting ready for the day or cooking for your family.

 

 

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Which aspects of your life are impacted by your RA symptoms?

Beyond impacting the body, experiencing RA symptoms can influence many other areas of life. Consider how your RA symptoms get in the way of living life the way you want to.

 

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RA affects my

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How frequently do you take over-the-counter (OTC) or prescription pain medication to help manage your RA pain?

You may take pain medications (such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen) to help you manage RA symptoms, but continued use of pain medication could mean your RA symptoms are not being managed effectively.

Consider how often you take pain medications, which types, and in what quantities. Be sure to share those details with your rheumatologist so that they can help you manage symptoms effectively.

 

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RA affects my

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I rely on OTC or prescription pain medication   to manage my RA pain.

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Personal goals can help you measure how effectively your RA treatment plan is reducing the impact of RA on your real life.

What are your personalgoals for RA treatment?

Examples of personal goals could include: walking without discomfort, traveling without thinking about the pain, or enjoying social engagements with less fatigue. In addition to clinical goals, like potential for remission, setting personal goals for RA treatment can help you and your rheumatologist develop a more successful treatment plan.

Personal goals can help you measure how effectively your RA treatment plan is reducing the impact of RA on your real life. What are your personal goals for RA treatment?

Examples of personal goals could include: walking without discomfort, traveling without thinking about the pain, or enjoying social engagements with less fatigue.

In addition to clinical goals, like relieving symptoms, setting personal goals for RA treatment can help you and your rheumatologist develop a more successful treatment plan.

 

You have chosen not to answer the question.

RA affects my

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You have chosen not to answer the question.

I rely on OTC or prescription pain medication   to manage my RA pain.

You have chosen not to answer the question.

My personal goals for RA treatment include  .

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Are you satisfied with your current RA treatment plan?

If you’re experiencing pain and difficulty, or not reaching the personal goals you specified in the previous question, tell your rheumatologist to see if a change in treatment is right for you.

 

You have chosen not to answer the question.

RA affects my

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You have chosen not to answer the question.

I rely on OTC or prescription pain medication   to manage my RA pain.

You have chosen not to answer the question.

My personal goals for RA treatment include  .

You have chosen not to answer the question.

 

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Thanks for completing your RA Check-In!

See your personalized RA Check-In results below. If you’re still experiencing symptoms despite being on treatment, bring it up at your next appointment. Your rheumatologist can evaluate if a change in treatment can help you get to your treatment goals.

Prefer a print-out? Download your results as a PDF.

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